Group Tour Information

Before You visitUGA

We encourage chaperones and students to review the following information packet prior to visiting campus! The page is printer friendly for those wishing to distribute the information to each student.

For chaperones who would like to present students with a quiz based on the information below, there are two easy options to do so. For a PDF version to distribute to students, please click here. For an online version via Survey Monkey, please click here. Please note that the online quiz is for educational purposes and technology integration and the quizzes submited through Survey Monkey are deleted once they are submitted

We hope you enjoy learning about UGA and we look forward to seeing you soon! Go Dawgs!


  • Abraham Baldwin, a Yale graduate and one of Georgia’s three delegates to the Constitutional Convention, wrote the charter that established the University of Georgia. On January 25,1785, the state legislature approved the document and the University of Georgia became the first state-chartered university in the nation. UGA’s charter is older than the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the White House, and the U.S. Capitol. To learn more about UGA's beginnings, please review the brief history of the university.
  • Though UGA was chartered in 1785, the first classes were not held until 1801.
  • Founders sought a remote location where students would be isolated from the “temptations” of urban life. A site was chosen on a stretch of high, wooded ground on the west bank of the Oconee River. The town which grew up around the new University was named for its Greek counterpart, that great center of learning, Athens.

    Athens and the university in 1840 as depicted in the painting by George Cooke.

    Athens and the university in 1840 as depicted in the painting by George Cooke.

  • Old College, completed in 1806, was the first permanent building on campus and is the oldest surviving structure in this part of Georgia. Modeled after Connecticut Hall at Yale, Old College was constructed as an all-purpose building, but soon was used mainly as a dormitory. Alexander H. Stephens, vice president of the Confederacy, and Crawford W. Long, pioneer in the use of anesthesia, shared a room in Old College when they were students in 1832.
  • The Arch, modeled after the great seal of the state, serves as the main entrance to campus. Erected in 1858, the Arch has become the primary symbol of the University. The three pillars of the Arch stand for “Wisdom, Justice, and Moderation,” which is also the state motto. A well-known university legend states that any undergraduate that walks under the Arch will not graduate. Today, graduates and their families will line up at the Arch on graduation day as the graduates celebrate their achievement by finally walking under the Arch.

    UGA's logo

    UGA's logo

  • Demosthenian and Phi Kappa literary societies formed the center of the student extracurricular activities in the early years of the university. Their respective halls can be found on North Campus.
  • In the early days of the University, students were required to attend a daily religious service which was held in the Chapel. Built in 1832, the UGA Chapel is one of the finest examples of Greek Revival architecture in the state. A bell tower originally crowned the roof of the Chapel, but in the early 1900s was found to be rotten and was removed. The bell, which rang for the beginning and end of class, and in emergencies, was placed at the top of a wooden tower at the back of the Chapel. Now the bell is rung to mark athletic victories or other special occasions. The sundial in front of the Chapel marks the site of the famous Toombs Oak. A famous senator and Confederate general, Robert Toombs began a distinguished career by being expelled from the University in 1825. According to legend, he reappeared at commencement and spoke so eloquently under the oak tree that the audience left the Chapel to hear him. Years later on the day Toombs died, lightning supposedly hit and destroyed the oak tree under which he had stood to give his address.

    UGA Chapel bell

    Click the image to watch a brief video on the restoration of the bell.

  • Football began at UGA in 1892, when Georgia won its first game over Mercer University 50-0. Early football games were played on Herty Field (left), which has since served as a parking lot before undergoing renovation to inviting green space complete with a fountain. Among the other early athletic squads were lacrosse, polo, baseball and pushball. Though the school’s first mascot was a goat, the tradition of a bulldog mascot dates to the early days of the university’s athletics program. From a female bull terrier named Trilby in 1894 to Russ today and Uga IX in the future, the bulldog has long been beloved by fans. With the Uga line widely considered one of America’s greatest mascots, Sports Illustrated named Uga V the #1 mascot in the country in 1997.

    Russ

    Russ

  • UGA athletic teams have won 38 national championships including: ten in women’s gymnastics (1987, 1989, 1993, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009); eight in men’s tennis (1985, 1987, 1999, 2001, 2006 indoor, 2007 indoor, 2007, 2008); four in women’s swimming and diving (1999, 2000, 2001, 2005); five in women’s tennis (1994, 1994 indoor, 1995 indoor, 2000, 2002 indoor); two in men’s golf (1999, 2005); five in equestrian (2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2010); two in football (1942, 1980); and one each in baseball (1990), and women’s golf (2001).
  • A total of 21 current or former UGA athletes participated in the 2008 Beijing Olympics representing 12 different countries.
  • UGA and Delta Air Lines have created the Delta Prize for Global Understanding, an annual award that recognizes individuals or groups whose initiatives have promoted peace and cooperation among cultures and nations of the world. Previous award winners include former Russian leader Mikhail Gorbachev, Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa and former President Jimmy Carter, his wife, Rosalyn and the Carter Center.

    Delta Prize for Global Understanding

    Delta Prize for Global Understanding

  • Sanford Stadium, home to the Georgia Bulldogs football team, opened in 1929. It was constructed in the valley between the North Campus and South Campus. The playing field is famously nestled “between the hedges.” The 1996 Olympic soccer matches were held in Sanford Stadium. Today, the stadium seats 92,746 screaming fans and is the seventh largest on-campus stadium in the nation. During the six or seven home games each year, Sanford Stadium becomes the state’s seventh largest city.

    Sanford Stadium

    Sanford Stadium is home to the Bulldogs football team.

  • The 430,000 square-foot Ramsey Student Center for Physical Activities is one of the largest and most comprehensive fitness/exercise facilities for students and faculty in the country. It was once rated by Sport Illustrated as the nation’s best such facility.

    Gabrielsen Natatorium inside the Ramsey Center

    Gabrielsen Natatorium inside the Ramsey Center

  • Located along the Oconee River, to the south of main campus, The State Botanical Garden of Georgia encompasses 313 acres and features miles of winding trails.
  • Charlayne Hunter-Gault and Dr. Hamilton Holmes became the first African American students to enter the University of Georgia in 1961. After receiving his degree, the late Dr. Holmes went on to a career as a respected physician in Atlanta. Mrs. Hunter-Gault became a nationally recognized reporter for the Public Broadcasting System and later, the CNN Bureau chief in South Africa. In commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the university’s desegregation, the academic building was renamed the Holmes-Hunter Building. UGA celebrated the 50th anniversary of the school's desegregation in January 2011.

    Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes speak to the press following their admission to UGA.

    Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes speak to the press
                       following their admission to UGA.

  • Since 1851, 25 governors of the state of Georgia have attended the University.
  • The Georgia Museum of Art was designated the state museum of art in 1982. More than 7,000 works are included in the museum’s permanent collection with primary emphasis in 19th and 20th Century American Art. The Georgia Museum of Art facility is located on east campus and recently reopened after being closed for more than a year due to renovations and additions.
  • The university’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication administers the Peabody Award – one of the oldest and most famous international awards for excellence in radio and television broadcasting.

    Peabody Award

    Peabody Award